2017-05-14 / News

Chesaning Union Schools look to buy buses and 3-D printers

By Jeanne Marcello
Staff Reporter


Schools are now being encouraged to introduce engineering concepts to students at a young age. On May 9, students in Lynette Devereaux’s first grade class at Big Rock Elementary School were working on Rapunzel Engineers an Escape. Here, first graders Brooke Springer (left) and Bella James (right) work on their solution to help Rapunzel (a marble) escape from the tower shown in the background. Devereaux explained that they have used several re-engineered fairytales to introduce basic engineering concepts. 
TCC Photo by Jeanne Marcello Schools are now being encouraged to introduce engineering concepts to students at a young age. On May 9, students in Lynette Devereaux’s first grade class at Big Rock Elementary School were working on Rapunzel Engineers an Escape. Here, first graders Brooke Springer (left) and Bella James (right) work on their solution to help Rapunzel (a marble) escape from the tower shown in the background. Devereaux explained that they have used several re-engineered fairytales to introduce basic engineering concepts. TCC Photo by Jeanne Marcello CHESANING – Chesaning Union Schools will be able to invest in some big-ticket technology items and a few newer school buses in the next budget year thanks to the school bus and technology bond, which was approved by voters back in 2011.

During the May 8 meeting of the Chesaning Union Schools Board of Education, finance director Paula Peterson informed the school board the bus and technology bond is due for another lump sum withdrawal, in the amount of $345,000. She said the last withdrawal was made in 2014.

Superintendent Mike McGough told the school board, “We are going to purchase a 3-D printer.”

IT Coordinator Brett Russell explained the goal is to purchase four printers, a small-scale one at each building, as well as a larger-scale one.

School board vice president Brian Lewis, who is an engineer, asked which software would be used with the printers. Brett responded, “Solidworks.” Lewis approved.

McGough said, “We’ve also talked about putting some tech labs together, so students can use a 3D printer. Our goal is to get a lab within the district. The technology consultant at the ISD said we could use the tech bond for it.”

Trustee Charles Rolfe asked what a school bus costs.

Transportation Director Steve Lane estimated he should be able to get buses that are a couple of years old for about $60,000 to $65,000 each.

Board secretary Becky Butcher moved approval of the lump sum withdrawal from the school bus and technology bond fund.

The school bus and technology bond was approved by voters in February of 2011. The levy was approved at 1.5 mills; the school board restructured the bond in 2014, reducing the levy to 0.5 mills.

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